Why Do Kennedy’s Words Still Matter?

President Kennedy’s words still matter because of his legendary public image and popularity and because his words continue to offer inspiration to American leaders, and to leaders around the world. One of the greatest reasons for this trend has been the immense popularity of the late American President, who has actually become a legend, immortalized after his assassination. Since then, the image of President John F. Kennedy in popular culture has been largely positive, and arguably larger than life. President John F. Kennedy has been the most popular American President in the last six decades, even surpassing World War II hero President Dwight D. Eisenhower, his predecessor, in popular approval.

The Kennedy Assassination in 1963 has been imprinted as a strong historical event in the memory of the American generation of the time, which has been carried forward to the next generations as a legacy. A great factor fueling the legend of John F. Kennedy has been the controversial conspiracy theories involved in his assassination, which captivate the imagination of people who were not even born at the time of this event. The legacy and the legend of John F. Kennedy has been greatly reinforced by the popular and mainstream media by actually entertaining these conspiracy theories, even when they were largely anti-establishment. The result of this has been that most of the Americans now believe that there indeed was a conspiracy behind the assassination of President John F. Kennedy other than the official version, according to a Gallup poll.

The legend of President Kennedy is another reason why the flaws of his Presidency, such as the Bay of Pigs incident, are often ignored and forgotten. Furthermore, he was a charismatic personality and a masterful orator and his words still inspire anyone who listens to his recorded speeches. His patriotic quote “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country” is one that is popular not only throughout the United States, but even around the world.

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