Why do knights fight?

Back in the middle Ages or medieval times, it was common for rulers, heads of states, and kings to bestow the honorary title of knight to a person who is considered ready to serve and protect his own country from various enemies. Knighthood was almost synonymous with being soldiers and warriors back in those times and people can only become knights if they undergo and pass their so-called warrior training. Being considered defenders of the throne or of their own country and people, knights are also considered as soldiers that are sent to fight against those who try to invade his country or those who try to hurt his own people. With this specific duty, knights often fight in various battles and all these are done as a form of service to his superior, king, or own country.

In medieval times, knights are often trained to fight with a sword. This explains the metallic and shining armors that are associated with knights when they fight or when they guard their kings and queens. Stories are often told about knights in shining armor that protect their people or the royal family that they serve. Back in those times, battle between enemies was typically done with knives and swords. Knights were also often trained to fight while riding horses which were the main means of transportation of soldiers in the middle Ages. Knights with swords and on horseback were considered very essential during fighting and battles as it gives a great advantage in terms of striking force and speed. Being trained warriors and soldiers, many knights in the medieval times were involved in lots of fighting and many of which were done as a means of protection from enemies or protection to the throne and the royal family that they serve.

The use of knights is said to have spread in many countries around Europe in the Middle Ages. Back in those times, wars were fought with knights on horses or on the ground using swords. These fights were eventually replaced though with gun warfare as soon as gun powder and firearms became available starting in the 16th century.

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