Why is ECG important?

Why is ECG important?

Electrocardiograph (ECG), also known as elektrokardiogramm (EKG) in German, is a kind of medical equipment used to measure the electrical movements of the heart. It is an important mechanism that is commonly used by medical practitioners in their preliminary assessment of patients who are suspected of having heart related illnesses.

ECG machine is an effective tool used in detecting irregularities that affects the normal functioning of the heart. The use of ECG is simple, fast, safe, pain free and inexpensive which is why most medical facilities nowadays have them.

ECG is performed by placing self-adhesive electrodes with wires on selected areas of the patient’s body (arms, legs, and chest). The electrodes will then detect the different electrical impulse that is generated by the heart and transmit them to the machine. An ECG graph report is then created by the machine which the doctor will later read as part of the diagnosis.

ECG can determine conditions like previous heart attack, obstruction in the arteries of the heart, enlargement of the heart muscle, heart rhythm, heart rate, and other conduction abnormalities”.

ECG is also used in individuals who undergo experimental testing of drugs that may have a known or possible cardiac effect. It is also applied in examining individuals who are either active in sports or have a high-risk occupation. And under normal conditions, ECG is used in monitoring patients that will go through a non-cardiac surgical procedure as part of their preoperative assessment, as well as observing patients that are treated with antiarrhythmic drugs.

However, it should be considered that ECG is not 100% accurate. There may be instances of getting a normal ECG reading when patients actually have a heart disease, or vice versa. Because of this, doctors do not rely on ECG results alone. Aside from ECG, batteries of tests are conducted to ensure the overall health status of the patient.

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