Why is Taxonomy important?

Why is Taxonomy important?

In the Bible, it is stated that God created everything including all the plants, animals and man. Genesis 2:19-20 stated that He (God) brought them to the man (Adam) to see what he would name them; and whatever the man called each living creature, that was its name. So the man gave names to all the livestock, the birds of the air and all the beasts of the field.” This Biblical account can be assumed as the first application of taxonomy in both the life and culture of man.

Taxonomy is defined as the science and practice of giving names, description and classification to organisms that includes all floras, fauna and microorganisms that exists in all parts of the world. Taxonomy aims to categorize and enumerate the different species that are present in our highly diverse ecosystem in order for people to treat the distinguished living organisms in accordance to what their natures are. Taxonomy is credited to Carl Linnaeus who is also considered one of the fathers of modern ecology.
Taxonomy is an essential part of science, in addition to society’s development, because it provides vital information which can be used by people to identify all living organisms by their own names, nature, and physiological features. Taxonomy makes it possible for people to differentiate species to its other kinds through labeling or naming them in accordance to its definitive characteristics and other aspects. Also, with the help of taxonomy, people can map out the evolutionary account of every species thus adding to the knowledge that every living organism on Earth is truly connected with each other in one way or another.
Presently, taxonomy goes beyond the classification of species as it is being used in sorting almost everything that people can think of that includes objects either animate or inanimate, ideas, procedures, places, material goods, and even social relationships through the application of an appropriate taxonomic method.

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