Why was Common Sense written?

Why was Common Sense written?

Common Sense was a published pamphlet written by Thomas Paine. This publication, which talks about the American Revolutionary war, was released anonymously last January 10, 1776. A forty-eight paged pamphlet, Thomas Paine started writing Common Sense in 1775 under a title of Plain Truth. With the help of Benjamin Rush, the script was edited, well-polished and published, with the title Common Sense as suggested also by Benjamin Rush. Once it was made available in the market, it become popular at an instant primarily because of its seemingly treacherous content. At the end of the first year from the date of its publication, R. Bell, Third Street, Philadelphia already sold half a million copies and had twenty-five editions. Paine decided to donate the earnings from his work to the Continental Army under the leadership of Sir George Washington.
Structured in a sermon-like approach with references from the Bible, Thomas Paine’s Common Sense was highly scrutinized by many, especially the British leaders. Thomas Paine wrote the political pamphlet as an eye opener to the colonized people of America, which brought a strong, rising revolutionary sentiment towards the colonizers. In his pamphlet, it explicitly divulges the blame towards the British leader, George III, for the suffering and grief of many colonies. The Common Sense was written for the purpose of advocating an immediate declaration of independence, which indeed was achieved by the state. The contents of the pamphlet discussed the tyrannies involved in the origin and design of the government as well as it critiques the English constitution. Furthermore, it provided convincing explanations of why America should separate from Britain. Common Sense was written in simple, comprehensible language that convinced people of America to fight for its independence and be free from the cruelty of the British rule.

Post Comment